Aged Lamb Saddle, Pickled Cabbage Puree, Charred Cucumber, Bulgur and Kefir Raita


*This recipe was created for 4 servings. To adjust the serving quantity, enter a new yield (4 to 1,000 servings) then click resize. As with any recipe, changing the quantity may affect flavor intensity. Please adjust ingredients according to your taste.

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IngredientsQuantities
Pickled Cabbage Puree
Butter 50 g
Shallots, sliced 50 g
Shallots, sliced 400 g
Red wine 100 g
Red wine vinegar 135 g
Vegetable stock 400 g
Billy Bee Liquid White Honey 35 g
Charred Cucumber
Baby cucumber, sliced 1
Bulgur
Bulgur 1 cup
Water 1 cup
Butter 1 cup
Club House Sriracha & Lime 50 g
Lemon juice 10 g
Club House Sea Salt, French Mediterranean 1/2 tsp
Kefir Raita
Kefir yogurt 400 mL
Cucumber 200 g
Fresh coriander 25 g
Scallion 100 g
Club House Garam Masala 75 g
Xanthan gum 15 g
Billy Bee Honey, to taste 1/2 tsp
Club House Sea Salt, French Mediterranean, to taste 1/2 tsp
Aged Lamb Saddle
Lamb saddle, skirts removed 3 lb
Garnish
Micro Coriander 10 g
Clarified Sriracha Butter 50 g
Maldon Salt 5 g

Instructions

This recipe was created for Club House for Chefs by: Jordan Wilkinson, Chef at Hexagon Restaurant in Oakville.

For the Aged Lamb Saddle: Age lamb saddle for one week in appropriate refrigeration conditions. After it is aged, remove dried exterior and the tenderloin. Next, take out the spine carefully going around the loin. Repeat on the other side of the saddle. Next remove excess fat and sinew. Once clean, separate the loins on either side so that you are left with two pieces. Form the lamb loin into a torchon by wrapping in saran wrap tying at either end and then vacuum packing for sous vide. Sous vide the loin at 50°C for one hour then remove and place in an ice bath. To finish, take out of packaging and place on a wire rack in a two-inch hotel pan. Using a ladle and oil at 350°C, pour oil of the loin until the fat has rendered out and becomes slightly puffed. Next flash in the oven until it has reached desired temperature and doneness. Let rest for 5-10 minutes, slice and plate.

For the Pickled Cabbage Puree: Melt butter in saucepan, add shallots and cook till translucent. Next add cabbage, sauté for 5 minutes and deglaze with red wine. Cook until cabbage begins to soften. Add vegetable stock and cook on medium heat, covered, for around 25 minutes, or until completely cooked. Once most of the liquid is gone remove cabbage and put into a Vitamix to purée. Add any remaining liquid to Vitamix for a desired consistency. Season with Billy Bee Honey and Club House Sea Salt, French Mediterranean. Stain purée through a fine mesh strainer. Reserve in refrigerator.

For the Charred Cucumber: Cut baby cucumber into 3-centimeter cylinders, ring cut the skin out saving the interior of the cucumber. For plating, char on a charcoal grill or with a food safe torch.

For the Bulgur: Pour 1 cup of boiling water on 1 cup of bulgur in a bowl, let stand for one hour. Clarify butter with Club House Sriracha & Lime Seasoning. Once milk solids have separated, strain through a fryer cone filter so you are left with a bright red butter. Once time to plate, mix bulgur with desired amount of the infused butter, lemon juice and Club House Sea Salt, French Mediterranean.

For the Kefir Raita: In a Vitamix, blend kefir yogurt with cucumber, coriander, scallion, Club House Garam Masala. Blend on high for 3 minutes until smooth. Add xanthan gum and blend for another minute. Next, season mixture with Billy Bee Honey and Club House Sea Salt, French Mediterranean. Once seasoned, strain through a fine mesh strainer and reserve in refrigerator.

For Serving: Bring out raita and temper to room temperature. Heat cabbage purée in a small sauce pot and plate, add charred cucumbers, bulgur, and raita. Once the lamb is well-rested, slice into desired portion size and plate. Garnish with micro coriander and add some clarified sriracha butter to the raita for added garnish. Add maldon salt to the face of the lamb.

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