Savourydrinksgainingtractiononmenus

Savoury drinks gaining traction on menus

April 22 2014

In a bid to experience new, innovative drinks, consumers are opting for savoury drinks when they go out to a bar or restaurant.

This is according to Technomic, which revealed the more traditional sweet flavours are being rivalled by savoury and even salty ones, as customers look to give their taste buds a different experience. 

Such flavours are particularly being used in beers and spirits. One example cited was the rise in popularity of Mexican micheladas, which are beer cocktails comprising of lime juice, salt or spices, and tomato juice. 

It transpired that Budweiser's and Bud Light's Cheladas - which are made with Clamato tomato cocktail - witnessed a huge volume expansion of 20 per cent between 2010 and 2012.

This desire for innovative drinks was confirmed by Technomic research, which revealed how the lion's share (59 per cent) of those polled said they had opted for a beverage that they had never had before in a bar or restaurant within the last four weeks.  

It is believed these drinks that have a sharper taste to them could appeal more to male consumers, who are not overly enamoured by the concept of sweet beverages. 

The classic Bloody Mary has also witnessed a rise in popularity as of late. 

Technomic reported how the frequency of the savoury cocktail on menus has risen nearly nine per cent year-on-year, according to its data from the first quarter of 2014. 

Furthermore, savoury tastes such as chipotle, bacon and cajun have been revealed to be the fastest growing flavours in speciality drinks over the last year, highlighting consumers' desire to try something new and adventurous. 

Those who supply spirits have also been jumping onto the bandwagon when it comes to interesting flavours. UV Vodka recently released UV Salty Watermelon, while Effen and Pinnacle announced its range of salted-caramel vodkas last year. 

With some alcoholic beverage sales reportedly falling in restaurants and bars, these innovative drinks could help statistics to rise back up to their former heights.